Get your entries in today for the Matt Loves Cameras Purple competition and zine!

Make sure you complete the Matt Loves Purple entry form – send up to four of your favourite Purple images to me before the deadline of 15 May 2021.

Further details about the comp and zine can be found on the LomoChrome Purple competition rules and information page. Judging will be in late May / early June 2021.

Zack Cyphers

Instagram: @themotorcyclelibrarian

I shot these on my Canon T90 at 400 ISO and had them processed and scanned by a camera store here in town. I’m still learning this camera, and I think I hadn’t metered some of these correctly. I don’t mind, though because it seems to have created an interesting effect. I used Lightroom sparingly to give the exposure a nudge in some cases.

Pat Bowden

Instagram: @patographics

All of these images were shot with a Canon EOS 5000 film camera, and developed at George’s Cameras in Sydney. I shot this roll at many different places, from Enmore and Newtown in the city of Sydney, to my hometown of Katoomba in the Blue Mountains, and Bathurst a bit further out in the country. Lots of fun and will definitely shoot again!

Adrian Doyle

Instagram: @doyleadrian

Double exposure – the first exposure is a screen printed poster hanging in town of a girl coughing and what looks like covid particles coming out of her mouth and the second exposures are shots around town. I used a canon ft ql with 58mm lens shooting the whole roll and then reloading it for the second exposure (I shot two rolls this way and my back was killing me : ).

The poster is by @biovarg and I used my local shop southeastern cameras in Carrboro NC as the lab @sec_carrboro. My favorite is AdrianDoyleCovid-x-America.jpg the frames of the double exposure didn’t quite line up but ended up working as it shows a BLM mural at the top section and a American flag mural below and them combined with the coughing particles frame is perfect for the last 12 months

Bob St-Cyr

Instagram: @foto.bob

Mamiya C330 Pro S w/ 55 mm Mamiya-Sekor, Y2 & ND +10 stop filters, IS0 400, Sekonic L408 metre f/22 between 2-4 minutes and Sirui tripod. It was good. Processed at home in Cinestill C41 kit. Between the two, I lean towards the tall stump.

David Mihaly

@theoldcameraguy on YouTube, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, Flickr, and Clubhouse

All of these images were taken on my Pentax 67 with the 55mm f4 lens. I rated the film at ISO 320, developed it with my CineStill C-41 kit, and scanned the negatives with my Epson V550 using Epson Scan 2 software.

A little background on the images – “Into the Woods” pictures a row of trees at Ariel Foundation Park, which is an interesting mix of natural and industrial elements, including ruins of the old Pittsburgh Plate Glass Factory which once stood on this ground in Mount Vernon, Ohio. “Westinghouse Remains” features one of two remaining buildings of the sprawling Westinghouse Appliance Complex which once loomed large over the city of Mansfield, Ohio. “The Way” features a lonesome stretch of Richardson Road in Groveport, Ohio. My favorite image is “Sunset” which presents a brooding sky over the abandoned Sunset Drive-In movie theater in Ontario, Ohio

Roxanna Angles

Instagram @roxannalog

All of these were taken with my Canon AE-1 with Lomochrome Purple, shot at ISO200 (I think!) I develop all my film at home. Two of these were taken at home using water and flowers with a bit of creative lighting. The other was taken in San Diego CA at one of their beautiful parks. I love Lomochrome Purple and the dreams it creates on film.

Alan Ma

Instagram: @thefilmsweats

I’m actually in the process of writing up an article on this for the @pixels.grain blog (shameless plug!) – especially those night shots. The two daytime shots are on the rolleiflex 2.8E Planar, at iso 200. They were shot on a super windy stormy day at Dee Why beach in Sydney. I develop my own film, via stand develop c41 45 mins dev 45 mins blix, which I think helps make it more ‘forgiving’ of bad exposures. Also the colour shifts don’t matter when shooting this film! The moodiness, red flags and orange sand really made a great mix with the purple film and grain. I particularly like the way the seagulls ‘pop’ in the shot against the purple/grey rocks. the two night time shots were unexpectedly fantastic.

Never tried shooting this at night before. exposed at iso50 on the mamiya c220 with 55mm f4.5 sekor lens. Shot on the Anzac bridge in Pyrmont, Sydney. on a night walk with the pixels.grain crew – come join us some time! More details to come on our blog – you’ll have to check us out for the secrets of our night magic!!

Lisa J Brinkworth

Instagram @fox_35mm

Home developed in my bathtub! All shot at ISO 400 in my local area. I love how varied the effects are for Lomochrome purple.

Lucy Angel Egan

Instagram @lucille_2.0 @soulspit.jpeg

I was given a roll of LomoChrome Purple 400 ISO as a gift from a dear friend of mine. During lockdown I became fascinated with infrared photography so when I was gifted this film I couldn’t wait to paint the world in backwards colours.

I mulled over it for a while until I managed to get my hands on a Kiwiburn (New Zealand Burning Man) ticket. I knew that was where I needed to shoot this film, a purple portal to the paddock. Next was the great debate, what camera do I use? 5 days in the forest, no power, no showers, just a dusty kindney pocket strapped to my waist as I travel the festival. Do I risk my Pentax K1000 to orchestrate every detail of every picture as my perfectionist heart desires? With high risk of dirt, water, glitter and ash getting into the camera I was hesitant.

I settled on my Olympus Superzoom 70G (queue gasps from the audience at the idea of putting Lomo film in a point and shoot). I had taken careful consideration as to the experience of Kiwiburn, one of it’s burning principles being immediacy. Being present in the moment and existing just as you are, I couldn’t be fiddling to get my F stop right and miss what was happening right in front of me. It is also therapeutic to let go of control, often us film photographers can become such micro managers we are scared to not have governance over every setting in a photograph. I took this opportunity to leave only the composition under my control and surrender the rest to my 12cm x 6cm silver companion.

I lab developed my negatives and was speechless at the results. Each photograph told such a distinct narrative I was injected back into the festival. Moments that were captured participating, not just observing. One of my standout photographs was the of my best mate Angus. We had been sitting in the grass writing letters for the temple burn as Angus had been plucking leaves and strands from the ground unnoticed. As I finished my letter Angus slowly crawled forward as if stalking a silent prey. This was my first snap as he passed through a tunnel of light reaching for something I couldn’t see. When he sensed me watching he turned back, the same tunnel of light now dawning on his face, beard full of yellow flora. The last day of Kiwiburn Angus had ascended to his most vulnerable and comfortable forest self, you could see he was home.

Christopher James

Instagram: @filmplusdigital

These were made with the new-to-me Mamiya c330 and (mostly) the 135/f4.5 lens. The Pixels and Grain photo collective in Sydney organised a Lomo Purple night photowalk across Anzac Bridge just for this competition and it turned out to be a really tough night! None of the angles or frames we expected where possible, the light was terrible and the walk ended on a low energy note… which all changed when we started seeing the results. These were all metered at ISO 200 and I added a generous reciprocity-failure buffer as most frames were metered for >45 seconds.

The film was very kindly C41 home-developed and scanned by @thefilmsweats who did a beautiful job. I’m completely shocked and impressed that the images turned out at all, let alone as beautiful and interesting as they have. The scanned tiffs had a moderately green tint and have been lightly adjusted to enhance the purple / red, which is how I prefer them. These images are in order and sketch out the night walk. My favourite is the selfie at the end – we’re only missing the stellar @billthoo who was off making magic elsewhere at the time. Thank you for challenging us to get out there and find images – it turned out to be a real treat.

Richard Hall

Instagram: @connexions Twitter: @richardhall

St Chad’s and the Welsh Bridge, Shrewsbury were taken on a Voigtlander Bessa folding camera, with entirely guessed exposure, having gone out without a meter. The pool and the cow were taken with a Nikon F801 and Sigma 24-70mm with the film rated at 400 I think. All developed at home with a Digibase kit, scanned on Epson Perfection V850. Hoping that some images from Shrewsbury might give you some nostalgic joy, Matt. My favourite is probably the Welsh Bridge.

Jessika Raisor

IG @jessikaanalogs

This was my first time using this film, and I shot it on an Olympus Stylus 120 point and shoot so I couldn’t set the ISO manually, no idea what the camera decided on! Photos were taken on April 17,2021. They were developed by The Darkroom.

I knew I wanted to try this film out at the zoo because 1) I’d never shot outside my local park and 2) I thought the animals and the various exhibit designs could look interesting with the color shifting! My usage of film is the most basic, I’m there to experiment (I can take a normal photo with my phone) and to capture memories without leaving the moment from taking a bunch of pics on my phone.

So my process follows that, I am artist so I still try to make sure the shot has an interesting composition going but I am a point-and-shoot person all the way. My favorite is Red Panda in the Sky, when we saw it I knew I had to get a picture of it, this is super zoomed in as well. That tree was very tall! But I love how this photo came out, because this was a sunny blue sky day but the lomochrome tanned the sky making this look like a beautiful sunset shot and the red panda and trees are almost perfectly in silhouette, gives it air of mystery and that it could have been an actual wild photo and not just a zoo! I think it’s definitely the best one and wouldn’t have looked as good shot on another kind of film.

Matt Evans

Instagram and Twitter: @mattevansphoto

I shot this roll with the ultimate hipster camera: a Canon AE-1 with a 50mm. All images were shot at 400iso and processed by my local lab Splendid.nz This is only my second roll of purple film and I’m really pleased with the results, I don’t really shoot much specialty films as its hard to envisage the final outcome.

Col Taylor

Instagram: @coltaylorphotography

Here’s my 4 images from my Hassleblad Xpan, went down the the royal botanical Gardens here in Sydney NSW around with the iso settings and found that rated at around 200 worked best for me at 400 iso everything colour shiffted a lot as seen in two of the images . i will shoot this again but shoot the whole roll at 200. dev and scan by the lovley folks at Do Film Lab.

Nural Idrisoglu

Instagram: @nural_idr

These images were shot on 21 April 2021 in Turku, Finland, during one of my daily walks around the Koroinen village. I used a Leica M4P with an Industar 3,5/50mm lens. I mainly used f/8 or f/11 with 1/250, so I tried to treat the film as 200 ISO. I developed it at home using Tetenal Rapid C41 kit and scanned using Canon 9000F Mark II. They ended up being a bit grainier than I was expecting, but to be honest it was quite hard to narrow down to 4, I had at least 7 photos I was very proud of!

Mark Thompson

Instagram @fyldephoto

All the images were made around Blackpool, Lancashire, UK with a Hasselblad 501cm. This was the first time shooting with Lomochrome Purple so I did a bit of research and decided to expose it at ISO 200. It was quite an adventure as I’m mostly a monochrome film shooter. The film was home developed in Cinestill C41 kit and scanned on an Epson V750 Pro. I think that tulips are my favourite. My main impression is that this is a fun film but needs a sunny day for the best results – not that easy in the English spring.

Ken Bertram

Instagram @kenbertramphoto

Matt first I wanted to say that your competitions always push me to take photos that I wouldn’t normally do such as shooting Lomochrome purple this time of the year. I usually just bring it out in the summer. The pinhole was taken at the Lake Redman Bird View Deck. The camera used was the Holga Wide Pinhole and the exposure was 10 seconds. The rest of the images were taken on a Canon 7n with the Sigma 12-24mm lens. I shot Lomochrome Purple at E.I. 400 and I did overexpose some of the shots by one stop to try to increase the Aqua sky but I didn’t really see a difference between the two exposures. When I was a wee lad in the late 70’s and early 80’s my go to film was Kodak High Speed Infrared film, very difficult to use but the efforts were worth it and astonishing. There has been no film since that nor will there ever be one in the future. However LomoChrome Purple satisfies my photographic need for Infrared Film. I home developed all images and scanned the 35mm with a PrimeFilmXA scanner using VueScan Software. The 120 image I used the Canon 9000F. My favorite photo is the Gettysburg monument small in nature compared to that magnificent tree. And what has that tree seen and experienced in its entire history, makes me wonder.

Devon Christopher Adams

Instagram @devoncadams

Shooting on a Nikon AF600 in panorama mode, I made these photos on a day trip in early spring to southern Arizona in the States with my family. I developed in my kitchen with a UniColor kit and digitally scanned the photos myself. I love LomoPurple and also enjoy their RedScale, but bring back Lomo Turquoise. Long live Lomo Turquoise!

J. M. Golding

www.jmgolding.com

I bought a few rolls of Lomochrome Purple when it came back into production in 2019, and since then I’ve had it “on my list” to expose them. This competition was just the nudge I needed. For “In the valley of the imagination” I used a Holga 120S. For the other three images I used a Mamiyaflex C2 and rated the film at EI 400 (although “To hold a Spring moment” is one stop overexposed, so it would have effectively been at EI 200). I developed the film at home using a Unicolor K2 C-41 kit. I made the exposures in parks and nature preserves within a few miles of my home in northern California – with the exception of “To hold a Spring moment”, which I made in my backyard. I can’t possibly pick a favorite 🙂

Kalliopi Ioakeimidou

Instagram @myanalogueadventure

All these images were shot on Holga Micro-110 in Northern Greece, in March and April 2021.They were developed and scanned by Traia Photolab. I love the lo-fi aesthetics of this camera/film combo and how versatile the results can be in different lighting conditions.

Paul Hopper

Flickr: k1000roll_film

Shot with Pentax SF1n a camera with a voracious appetite for film. Purchased from Lomography.com and Lab developed .My favorite is the desert sky. Our zoo in the desert had to cancel their Christmas Wildlights show because of the pandemic. Due to the easing of restrictions they were able to have the light show in the spring. I picked an early entry time to catch the sunset and the lights. The Fairy Garden was at a commercial flower field. The General Store and Totem are in a theme park while closed for the pandemic held special food events. The event that I got these images at was the Boysenberry festive. There was purple everywhere!

General Store and Totem: Buena Park California. Desert Sky: Palm Desert California and Fairy Garden: Carlsbad California.

William Gordon

Instagram: @altwillboi

Shot on 35mm film on a Nikon FM3 at iso 400. developed at my local lab. My absolute favourite shot is the shopping trolley in the park. Im in love with the contrast between the relatively faithful reds and oranges and the greens that shift to vibrant purples.

Rafael Ferreira Rocha

Instagram: @rafarfalle

I’d wanted to shoot a Lomochrome Purple for a long, long time. Since Lomography closed their doors here on Brazil in 2017, it became a little more difficult to get your hands on one of their films. But earlier this year a photography project for college gave me more motivation to go after them, and finally I managed to get two LomoPurple!

The project consisted of photos inspired by surrealist photographers associated with the 1920’s movement (especially Dora Maar, Claude Cahun and Man Ray) and by Kandinsky’s color theory. I shot the Lomochromes on my Zenit 12XP (one of the adorable “russian tanks” of 35mm) at multiple ISO settings, and they were beautifully developed and scanned by a local lab called Granulado (@granulado.br).

These are four out of fifteen pictures I chose for the project. The two photos with the television and the flower were taken at ISO 200 and the one with the fruits at ISO 400. I guess the bokeh one was taken at ISO 400 too, which I think is also my favorite shot! Shooting this film was such a sweet experience of thinking about color changes and then seeing the diversity of results obtained, and I loved choosing it for experimenting with surrealist subject inspirations!!

Robert Rubin

Instagram @robert_rubin_photo

These were shot with the Mamiya RB67 and 65mm f 4.5 lens, on a walk around Princeton, New Jersey in April 2021. I shot the Lomo purple at 200 ISO Home developed c41 and scanned with an Epson v600. I love the old architecture of Princeton University, and the American Revolution history of the surrounding area. The significance of the Battle of Princeton memorial weighs heavy on me. On January 3rd 1777, Washington’s Continentals defeated the British regulars. The memorial was erected on the battlefield where countless unnamed American and British soldiers alike lie buried. It made for an interesting image with great historical importance. If I had to pick a favorite image of the four, I’d say it would be that shot of the memorial. Thanks for inspiring me to go out and shoot a roll of purple! I was pleasantly surprised with the results.

Keir Frei

Instagram @keirfrei

Nikon Em at 200 iso Developed by Fotofast at Taringa.

Dale Willetts

Instagram @delusions_of_competence

All shot on a Minolta 7000AF with 100mm macro lens, except Skull + Chromebones Which was taken on the same camera but with a lens baby composer. Film was rated at 200 iso and stand developed in Bellini C41 chemicals for an hour.

Heather M Grout

Instagram @mizgrout

I found a working Leicaflex SL with a Summicron-R 1:2/50 Leitz lens on Ebay last summer and it has been my go to kit – right up through this roll, when the advance lever broke. I shot this LOMO Purple 35mm film at 200 ISO, in my current home of Central Maine, U.S.A.. My favorite one of these images is the spooky, reflective, Hollowed Earth, because there is a feast of murky colors, lines, and implications. Since diving back into analogue after a nearly 15 year hiatus, I am getting my film expertly processed and scanned by Northeast Photographic. But man, do I miss the darkroom!

Adam Tuck

Instagram @heythisisadam

Pentax 67 & 105mm lens, shooting 35mm Purple without the mask so that the sprockets are shown. First time using this film and shooting sprockets! I was expecting the results to be a little more “infrared” with more separation between organic/inorganic materials, but still like the results I achieved! Lab developed (DoFilm in Sydney), scanned at home with Fuji X-Pro3 and Essential Film Holder using a combination of the 120 mask (to hold the film flat-ish) and the 35mm insert (to keep it straight) as I don’t have a sprocket-friendly mask for it.

Alison Grant

Instagram @amgbrissie80

These photos were taken with my Canon A-1, with the LomoChrome Purple set to ISO200. I hadn’t used the purple film set to that ISO before so wasn’t sure what to expect, but that’s one of the things I love about the purple film – you never quite know what you’re going to get. The photos were developed at FotoFast in Brisbane. The LomoChrome Purple is my favourite film because of the variety in the photos I get with it. I love it’s unpredictability and that it can be used at the different speeds and under varied conditions, which greatly changes the outcome of the photos. It’s a film that challenges and engages me, which is what I love about it and about film photography. It’s all but impossible to pick a favourite as each photo evokes different feelings and memories.

Jodi Benaroch

https://www.lomography.com/homes/jolom

These were made on Worldwide Pinhole Day (yes, killing two birds with one stone, so to speak). I used a Lomography Diana+ on the pinhole setting (no lens). I misread the light meter app I was using, and some of the photos ended up way overexposed, but I like the results. I find that Lomography films produce some interesting effects when overexposed. Developed at home, scanned using an Epson V600. All of the photos were taken in my front yard. I love Spring, and I love looking up at the trees and the way the sun shines through them. I’m also happy to have finally gotten photos that I like from that Diana camera! I wish I had taken a few more double exposures.

William Woon

Instagram @willsydney

I used Xpan II and rate the film at ISO200. Had it developed & scanned by Rewind Photo Lab (Glebe). My favourite image is #9 featuring 3 kids in front of a lighthouse. They’re my son and my niece and nephew posing for me. I’m exploring vertical panos and I quite like this one. All these photos are taken at Smoky Cape Lighthouse near South West Rocks during our Easter camping holiday in April 2021.

Angus Dawson

Instagram: @angus.j.dawson

These two pictures were taken with my Lomo Lubitel Number 1 camera, which is an early 1950s Soviet copy of the Voigtlander Brillant. It is a completely manual 120 film TLR. There is nowhere to provide any ISO settings, so I rated the film at 100. This camera is a relatively new purchase and I am still getting used to zone focusing. It has a lovely bright screen and seems to like really sunny days best. Both pictures were taken late afternoon close to my house in Blackheath in the Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

Deb Reul

Instagram @dlreul

Point and shoot cameras draw me in, especially the “brick” cameras of the 1980’s. I’m drawn to shapes and shadows, especially high contrast and simple composition. These were shot on my Konica C35 EF ( think Andy Warhol!) @ISO 400. I scored it at Value Village for less than 10$, and the film was home developed with #shotonfilm C41. My Fave is the RoyalLucifer, which when it blooms, will draw in the hummingbirds.

Ken Tuomi

Instagram @kentuomi

120 are Yashica-Mat 124, 35 are Pentax Spotmatic with Super Takumar glass. Estate sale and thrift store. Home dev with #shotonfilm C41. Fave – Fin but Dog has heart. I have khronic GAS and can’t settle on one camera or film. WTF mate? its not me day-job.

William Foster

Instagram @_fostewi_

This is my first time trying Lomo purple. In fact it was this podcast and contest that inspired me to give it a shot after not really paying attention to it before and I’m so glad I did. The square photo was taken using my Ranica P2 6×6 medium format pinhole camera. I have really enjoyed experimenting with pinhole with this excellent camera but in this case I had issues getting the film to grab the take up spool which lead to some accidental light leaks which ended up making the shots even more interesting. The next 3 we’re taken with my recently acquired Leica m4-2 on 35 mm. All photos were taken biking around toronto, developed at home and scanned on my Epson v550.

Chris Coker

Instagram @ncfilmfreak

I used my Canon f1 with a FD 50mm 1.4 lens I shot the lomo purple @ 200iso. My local lab developed these but since this roll as of about 2 weeks ago I have made the jump into developing my own bnw and color. My favorite image is the one with Trees and the reflection of them in a Still quiet creek. I just really like how the purple rendered a lite violet on that one

Jeremy Reed

Instagram @light.reeding

I chose a specific neighborhood called Oregon Hill in my hometown of Richmond, Virginia to shoot the Lomochrome Purple. Oregon Hill is known for its quirkiness but also has an eerie aesthetic as it is adjacent to the famous Hollywood Cemetery and is a popular destination during Halloween. For this study, I shot with my Canon AE-1 28mm f/2.8 at 400 ISO and I developed and scanned my film at home. My favorite image from the set is the house with eyes. It best embodies the overall feel of the neighborhood and I think looks excellent on Lomochrome Purple.

Oliver Padilla

Instagram @oliver.shoots.film

These were all shot with a Holga, so no control over the ISO, and I sent them out to a lab to get developed just so I wouldn’t risk ruining the roll at home. My friend wanted to get married alone with just her and her husband, and me taking photos. She gave me free reign to shoot whatever i wanted with whatever cameras I wanted, so I decided to take my Holga along with my Polaroid and another 35mm camera. When she told me she wanted to go up to the mountains for it, I immediately knew I wanted to use this film. This was my first time using the film, but I had seen photos of foliage and trees and they looked so cool, almost like a fairy tale, and I wanted that to translate to her photos on her wedding day.

Casey Hall

Instagram @thejunkbookjournal

All images were shot @ ISO 200 on a Leica CL using an adapted Canon LTM 28mm/f3.5 lens and lab developed. After four attempts of shooting Lomo purple in the last two years, this will be my first successful roll, (not even gonna get into that story, Neg Pos episode 362 if you care to know). I think its absolutely flipping awesome but there’s most certainly a time and place for this film. I tried to find colorful and busy compositions to really amplify all the color changing effects of the crazy purple. Overall, I’m very happy with the way they turned out, I had 5 images that I believe were competition worthy but had to eliminate one which was so hard. I’m so excited to shoot this film stock again, this experience was (as we say in America) “AWESOME!!” not brilliant!!”. My favorite image is probably the shot from inside the lake. It was a hot windy day in Dallas, Texas, there was just the coolest mix of complete strangers hanging out on the dock cooling off. The young lady on the dock had down-syndrome and she just wanted to hang out with the young crowd. You can see her mom standing over her shoulder trying to usher her back to a picnic as she felt uncomfortable letting her hangout with us. Plus the lomo purple made the scene look fantastic.Thanks Matt for taking care of us Neg Pos slackers and graciously allowing an extension. As always, thanks for putting in the hard working to make this happen, peace and love! Casey Hall

Michael Vickery

Instagram @defiantcharisma

You have many entries to get through Matt so I will try and make your life a little easier and keep this short. All taken on an untested Pentax K1000 at ISO 400 so what could go wrong?! Developed and scanned by Silver Halide Studios in Perth. I like the parrot image the most… probably. The others were shot in very smoky conditions which added to the challenge and maybe didn’t play to the strengths of the lomo purple. It likely added to the amount grain in the end result though. An interesting competition thank you.

Christopher Peter L. Domingo

Instagram @toppsdomingo

I shot these photos with my Minolta SR-T 101 at 200 and 400 ISO. My film roll was developed by @ykl.wonderphotoshop. It was the first time I tried shooting this film stock and I had a lot of fun! Definitely gonna try it again soon!

Bill Thoo

Instagram @billthoo

ISO50. C41 cold stand developed 1jour Dev and 1hour Blix. Hasselblad 500c/m + 40/4 and 80/2.8

Matt Murray

Instagram @mattlovescameras

I picked up my Contax G1 with the 45mm Planar lens for about $380 USD, bargain! The only issue was the LCD film counter wasn’t working as it had leaked. No big deal I thought, or is it?

I took the camera out to the industrial suburb of Eagle Farm in Brisbane and loaded a roll of Purple. The film advance is so quiet I wasn’t sure I’d loaded the film properly, and of course the film counter was no help. I opened up the back of the camera and guess what? I just exposed three or four frames of luscious LomoChrome Purple.

A couple of weeks later I went to finish the roll but the camera wouldn’t take an image. “I must’ve finished the film and it’s rewound…” I thought. With the LCD broken I couldn’t remember how many images I’d taken… I must have finished the roll? Or maybe Andre Domingues has cursed my electronic camera? I opened up the back AGAIN and ruined the last few rolls of the film! The cause of the issue was that the batteries were flat! In the end I only got 27 images in total from a roll of 36. Here are my favourite four.

Matthew Joseph

Instagram @fotodudenz

Hasselblad Xpan. Rated at 400. Lab developed. Redwoods.

Mark Fohl

Instagram @m.fohl

Holga 120 something. Lab processed, home scanned. Eat Fish!

Eric Vandrick

Instagram @ericvandrick Flickr ericvandrick

These four frames were taken on LomoChrome Purple 35mm. I rated this roll for ISO 160. The camera I used was a Nikon FM. I think I used my Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AIS (long nose) for all of these except for the one with the chicken – for that frame I used my Lensbaby Burnside 35mm f/2.8. All of these were taken in my yard at home except for the one with the rail cars – that was taken in the Norfolk Southern railyard near my house.

Kate Grout

Instragram @kaagrrr

*All developed/scanned by Northeast Photographic
*ISO is 200
*Cameras are Nikon F3 and Mamiya C330 f (last photo)
*Double Exposure and squirrel shot in Portland, Maine. The shot of 2 women and the medium format shot are in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

Kevin Lane

Instagram / Twitter: @kevinlane Flickr: Kevin Lane

Three of my images were made at Gibbs Gardens, a botanical garden near Ball Ground, Georgia, and the railcar image was made at the Chattanooga Choo Choo, a vintage train station that has been repurposed into a hotel and entertainment complex. The camera was my Minolta Maxxum 600si with the ISO set to 200. I processed the film myself at our community darkroom, Safelight District.

Jess Hobbs

Instagram and Twitter: @jesshobbsphoto YouTube: Jess Hobbs

All of my images were shot around my farm, as lockdown measures kept us from travelling between regions. But honestly, there isn’t a better place to shoot Lomo Purple in the spring! My favourite image is Crabapple 2, I love how those pink blossoms turned orange! And my favourite subject to shoot in the spring are fiddleheads, they are just so precious. All images were shot on my Canon F-1 at ISO 400, and I had them developed and scanned at Borealis Laboratoire in Montreal, Canada. Normally I would scan them myself, but seeing as I am barely making the deadline, I thought it best to leave that job to the professional! Thanks again Matt for giving so much leeway for me, I really appreciate it!

Kevin Dillon

Flickr: ricoh_shooter
I also can be found on the Negative Positives Film Photo Podcast Facebook group

Shot @ ISO 320 with a Pentax 645 using 45mm and 75mm lenses – Home developed using the Cinestill C-41 kit – Scanned using an Epson V550 – I’m bummed that I creased my film as I loaded my plastic reel. You can see the result in the closeup of the abandoned house. 🙁

Michael Newman

Greetings Matt, Thanks again for your film community at large…Purple roll challenge! It’s quite nice to have periodic photo assignments. My roll was shot on a Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta 531a which yields 16 frames on 120. I attempted to shoot 2 images at each location. The first image is titled “Purple Mary.” The next image was shot at Laurel Hill Cemetery. The third image is titled “You’ll Love Cinemagic;” unfortunately they have closed. My final photo was taken at the Saco Heath Preserve. The last few frames of this “fat” roll of lomochrome purple did suffer from light leaks. Oh well…that’s just the way it goes! Best regards, Michael Newman Buxton, Maine USA

Purple Mary
Laurel Hill
You’ll Love Cinemagic
Saco Heath

Peter Planta

Instagram: @peterplanta

Walked around the streets of my hometown, Vancouver, Canada, with the film rated at iso 100 in my Contax 139 Quartz with the 50mm f1.4. This was my first time rating it lower than 200 iso as I’ve only shot it at 200 and 400 in the past. I took it to the local lab to get it developed and scanned because I couldn’t quite get the colours right with my scanning setup for the previous roll which I had developed at home. My favourite image is the one of the broken mirror with the tree in the background. It just speaks to me and what I had wanted to capture. Lastly, I just wanted to say that I’m a big fan of the show, continue doing what you’re doing, Matt, and I’d definitely be down to participate in another competition like this one.

R’john Bernales

Instagram: @rjohnbernalesphoto

Pentax Pc35af rated at 200 iso

Clayton Sharp

Instagram: @claytonsharpphoto

I used a Nikon F100 for all my images. I photographed my wife Miller (the woman in the red dress) in our backyard one morning before I had to leave for work. I was planning on photographing her at 100 ASA, however the morning we chose to shoot was cloudy so I bumped my ASA to 400. The image of the flowers was taken at 200 ASA. I am currently building a deck for someone and I captured this image in their garden. I purchased the Lomography Purple online from B&H Photo. I had a local lab (Ball Photo located in Asheville, NC USA) develope and scan the 3 rolls I shot for this competition. I love the colors in the photo of the flowers however overall I would have to say my favorite shot is the close up of Miller in the white gloves holding the roses. I mean it’s my wife, of course its my favorite. With this film I tend to enjoy the images that were captured in defused, low contrast lighting. Its hard to wrap your head around the color shifts and what your end result is going to look like and I actually really enjoy the surprise. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to enter is competition. I had a blast.

LomoChrome Purple is a film that I have fallen in love with over the last year. If you’ve never tried it, I hope that this article and the sample images will inspire you to pick up a roll or five.

In this review of LomoChrome Purple, I give a brief historical overview of LomoChrome Purple and the film that inspired it, details on the colour shifts you can expect, the variable ISO nature of the film, an example of the same scene shot at different film speeds, sample images of LomoChrome Purple taken on four different cameras, and lots more! If you prefer audio, click on the play button in the header above.

I love LomoChrome Purple so much I decided to run a Purple competition through my film photography podcast Matt Loves Cameras. Entering is easy: shoot a roll of Purple between 1 February 2021 and 15 May 2021, then send me the best four images! The aim of the competition is to produce a film photography community zine by mid 2021.

Southern Queensland has never looked so trippy! LomoChrome Purple with Canon AF35ML

A brief history of LomoChrome Purple

LomoChrome Purple is a film sold by Lomography. Introduced in 2013, an article on the Lomography website from January that year lead with the headline “Introducing LomoChrome Purple – a color negative film that yields infrared results!“. It’s been described as a colour-shift film and even a “purplescale” film thanks to its signature look.

Woah wait, what was that about infrared? Is this an infrared film? No, read that headline again: despite its funky colour shifts, Purple is a colour negative film. This means it can be developed in the same C41 chemicals as other colour print films such as Fujifilm’s Superia lineup and Kodak’s Gold and Portra lines.

Grounded kangaroo, Brisbane Airport. LomoChrome Purple with Canon AF35ML

Purple: a love letter to Aerochrome

Lomography said that the development of this new product was due to demand from their customers. They frequently name dropped a legendary film as its inspiration: Kodak Aerochrome.

Kodak Aerochrome Infrared film 1443 (also known as Kodak Ektachrome Professional EIR) was an infrared-sensitive, false-colour reversal film. Kodak developed Aerochrome for aerial photographic applications, such as vegetation and forestry surveys, hydrology, and earth resources monitoring, where its infrared properties were a big advantage.

Yellow filters (or sometimes orange filters or other colours) were typically used on camera lenses to enhance the effects of the film.

Lomo Purple review
Is that you Aerochrome? No, it’s a lemon tree shot on LomoChrome Purple with the Olympus Pen FT.

Aerochrome was intended to be developed as a colour transparency or slide using process AR-5, but the Kodak data sheet also details how achieving a negative is easy with process AN-6 or C-41. Most infrared film today is developed as a transparency using the E6 process.

Despite their original scientific and military applications, Kodak’s infrared films were often used for artistic purposes due to the unique way that they rendered the world, giving a surreal view of otherwise ordinary scenes.

Enter LomoChrome Purple: an easier way to shift colour

In 2013 the Lomography website was still selling non-Kodak infrared films, but stocks were dwindling. Kodak Aerochrome had been officially discontinued in 2011 and was sorely missed.

Enter LomoChrome Purple, Lomography’s great hope to replicate the feel of shooting infrared films. Purple had two big advantages over infrared: it didn’t require any special filters, and it could be processed in widely available C-41 chemicals.

Lomo Purple sample images
I love this image! Pentax 645nii with LomoChrome Purple

LomoChrome Purple launch

Lomography launched LomoChrome Purple in January 2013, with customers receiving the first rolls a few months later in July 2013. Lomography stated that making Purple “takes a little longer to produce than other emulsions” which could explain the delay.

The first run of the film was 4000 rolls of LomoChrome Purple in 120 (selling for around $11 USD a roll) and and 3500 rolls in 35mm format (selling for around $9 USD a roll). It’s important to note that this was around double the cost of regular colour negative films at the time, yet reports were that the film was flying off shelves during the first couple of years of its release.

Looking back at reviews of the film from 2013-2014, there was the usual mix of enthusiasm and scepticism from the community. Some people loved it, some hated it, others couldn’t see the point. In other words, the reaction was pretty much like any other new product launch in the photographic industry.

Lomo Purple sample images
From left to right: LomoChrome Purple 35mm box, limited edition canister, and roll of Purple in 120.

In 2017 Lomography announced a reformulated emulsion which “increased the film’s sensitivity to red hues, improved exposure at the recommended setting of ISO 400, and significantly reduced grain”. Curiously, these were the same benefits stated with the launch of the 2019 formula a couple of years later. All recent boxes of LomoChrome Purple bear the text “New 2019 formula”.

In early 2020 Purple became available in 110 (a format Lomography have long championed), as well as in Lomography’s simple use 35mm cameras.

What effect does LomoChrome Purple film have on photos?

To quote Lomography: “blue becomes green, green becomes purple and yellow becomes pink! Red tones stay red though, which keeps skin tones looking natural in a sea of trippy hues.”

While all of this is true, your results may depend on the lighting conditions that you shoot in, and how you rate the film in terms of its ISO value, or sensitivity to light. You might also find some cool surprises along the way: what they didn’t mention in their promo material is that pink becomes yellow!

As for natural looking skin tones, well, they’re not bad, but I’m not sure I would describe them as natural. Let’s just say that they’re a whole lot better than LomoChrome Turquoise which made people look like smurfs!

LomoChrome Purple review
Portraits are super fun with Lomo Purple! Taken on the Pentax 645nii rated at ISO200.

Colour comparison: LomoChrome Purple versus colour negative film

For a side-by-side comparison of Lomo Purple versus a regular colour negative film, compare the two images below.

The top one was taken on my Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim with Lomochrome Purple. The bottom one was taken on my Superheadz Wide and Slim with Kodak Ultramax 400. The Superheadz camera is a copy of the Vivitar that has the same design, focal length, and quirks such as harsh vignetting. Both cameras have the same fixed aperture and shutter speed.

As you can see, the pink boat becomes pale yellow, the golden brown sand becomes purple, the blue sky becomes green, the yellow buoy becomes pink!

One of my favourite LomoChrome Purple images taken with the Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim.
LomoChrome Purple review
One of my favourite LomoChrome Purple images taken with the Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim.

What ISO should I shoot LomoChrome Purple at?

LomoChrome Purple is a variable ISO film, meaning that you can expose it within a wide range of light sensitivity (as measured by the ISO standard) with good results.

If you are shooting Purple in a camera where you can set the film speed or ISO yourself, Lomography recommend any speed between 100 and 400 for best results. Your choice will depend on the effect you’d like to see and the lighting conditions available to you.

If you have a newer camera with lots of fancy electronics, you may not be able to set the ISO yourself, which might be an issue. These cameras typically read the DX code on the film canister to set the speed of the film automatically for you, but LomoChrome Purple film canisters have no DX code.

In this case, the camera will typically default to its standard ISO speed, which is often 100. Check your camera manual though – some brands like Konica default to ISO 25 for non-DX coded film!

Lomo Purple review
Palm trees, Capalaba. Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim with LomoChrome Purple.

If you want to be really adventurous, you could use the film in a camera like the Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim, which has a single shutter speed, single aperture, and no way of setting the ISO at all. Pop the film in and go shoot in bright light for best results. I’m very happy with the images I achieved with this combination in the beautiful Queensland light.

What effect do different film speeds have on LomoChrome Purple?

A higher ISO speed such as 400 will typically produce more intense red and purple colours, wher