I almost dropped an Xpan. No, that’s not a joke, it’s the truth. In July 2019, podcaster, photographer, and Sunny 16 helper Matthew Joseph flew up to Brisbane for a few days and we met up for a photo walk. Matthew gave his Xpan to shoot with when the incident occurred.
Was it my clumsiness that almost saw a legendary camera smash to the floor of the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art? Or was it Matthew’s inability to put a camera strap on properly? Listen to episode 27 of Matt Loves Cameras to find out!

Plastic pano camera challenge

The 2020 Matt Loves Panos Plastic Pano Camera Challenge is now open!

Images I shot with Matthew’s Hasselblad Xpan

My favourite Pink Trumpet flowers! Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Brisbane’s Story Bridge,Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

South Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Fish St, South Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Beer kegs, Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Ice cream van, Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

Super saturated! Pink Trumpet flowers, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

South Bank, Brisbane, Hasselbald Xpan with Kodak Ultramax 400

The 2020 Matt Loves Panos Plastic Pano Camera Challenge is now open

The idea for a pano challenge was suggested by my friend Antony who received a Wide Pic panorama in the Emulsive Secret Santa, from none other than Sunny 16 podcast host Graeme Jago. Antony also has a very nice Fuji 617, but for this competition, I have kept the barrier to entry low. Very low. Here are the details…

Competition rules

  1. The camera must be made of plastic.
  2. The camera must be fixed-focus.
  3. The camera must weigh less than 150grams / 5oz.
  4. The camera needs to be capable of taking images in panoramic format. (This means that it can either be a dedicated panoramic camera, or one that switches between full frame and panorama modes. This is usually achieved by a set of blinds or gates masking the top and bottom of the frame.)
  5. If the camera needs any kind of battery to operate, it’s probably not eligible to take part. You can always check with me if you’re unsure.

Cameras that are allowed for #mattlovespanos

Examples of eligible cameras include, but are not limited to:
  • Ansco Pix.
  • Hanimex Panorama.
  • Wide Pic Panorama.
  • Halina Panorama.
  • Ultronic Panorama.
  • Panorama Optical Lens 25mm.
  • Vivitar panorama cameras such as the IC101 and PN2011.
As long as you adhere to the rules above, you’re in.

Cameras that aren’t allowed 

  • No Xpan, Widelux, Linhof, Fuji, Horseman or Horizont cameras are allowed to take part in the challenge.
  • No Minolta Riva / Ps – they actually focus so they are way too good.
  • No fancy Olympus Stylus or Pentax zoom cameras with pano gates / blinds.
  • If your camera contravenes any of the 5 competition rules above, it’s out.

What about the Sprocket Rocket?

The Sprocket Rocket zone focuses, so it’s nowhere near crappy enough. Stay tuned though, I’m thinking of running another challenge very soon.

Fingal Head taken on the Vivitar IC101 Panorama with Ilford HP4.

Competition details

  1. Photos must be taken between 1 March 2020 and the closing date 30 April 2020. (Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, there is no closing date for this challenge at the moment. Stay safe, snap those panos when you are able to do so. A new closing date will be advised in the months to come.)
  2. On or before the closing date, email up to four of your favourite images from your cheap plastic pano camera to mattlovescameras [AT] gmail [DOT] com.
  3. If possible, make your images a minimum of 3000 pixels on the long side. Crop out the black pano blinds area if you can before submission.
  4. Be sure to tell me where you took the photos, which camera you used and which film. You can also add your Twitter or Instagram details if you like.
  5. Images can be colour or black and white, and can feature any subject that shows off the panorama format well.
  6. As the entries roll in, I will feature them on the Matt Loves Panos 2020 competition entries page.
  7. If you’d like to share on Instagram or Twitter, use the hashtag #mattlovespanos
  8. The prizes are as crap as the cameras. Matthew Joseph has donated the only official Sunny 16 podcast mug in existence. I am donating some film that fell down the back of my fridge.
  9. If we get a lot of entries (or a small number of amazing entries!) we can look at doing a zine of them.
  10. Judges are Xpan man Matthew Joesph and me, Matt Murray.
  11. The judges will also be shooting with plastic panos. We will send our portfolio of four images to a jury of seven (as yet to be determined) film photography podcasters.

Light, footloose and focus free!

Konica Big Mini BM-201 review

The Big Mini is a compact 35mm point and shoot camera launched in 1990 by Japan’s oldest camera company, Konica. Over the last 30 years, it’s become a cult classic point and shoot camera, thanks to its sharp 35mm f3.5 lens. No doubt helping this reputation was the fact that 10-15 years ago, you could easily pick one up for around $20USD.

Pocket gem: The Konica Big Mini BM-201.

Although its reputation has grown since then, time has not been kind to the Big Mini. Perhaps more than any other compact camera, it has a reputation for dying. So is the Big Mini still worth buying in 2020 and beyond? Keep reading and find out.

You can also listen to my podcast review of the Konica Big Mini BM-201 by pressing play in the header of this page, or by searching Matt Loves Cameras in your favourite podcast app.

A truly pocket sized camera. When the lens retracts, the Big Mini is sleek and comfortably fits in your pocket.

Konica Big Mini models

The Big Mini is not just one camera, but a whole lineup of compact cameras from Konica. Some good, some not so good.

  • A4 – what looks like a Big Mini but isn’t a Big Mini? The Konica A4! This was the predecessor of the lineup introduced in 1989.
  • BM-200 Ex
  • BM-201 – the classic Big Mini, this is the model I’ve reviewed in this article.
  • Konica Big mini BM-300 – a new take on the Big Mini, the 300 series featured a circular lens housing instead of the square / rectangular lens housing. Konica 35mm f3.5 lens.
  • Konica Big Mini BM-300s – same model as the BM-300 but with different colours
  • Konica Big mini BM-301 features a data back
  • Konica Big mini BM-302
  • Konica Big Mini F – a premium Big Mini with a fast f2.8 lens.
  • Konica Big mini BM-310Z / 311Z / 411Z / 510 Z / 610 Z – zoom models, not as highly coveted as fixed lens models.
  • Konica Big Mini VX BM-701 – why was the Big Mini name slapped on this model? Fixed lens piece of cheap plastic.
  • Konica Big mini Neo-R – another zoom model.

My favourite boat, Victoria Point. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Fujifilm C200 film.

Konica Big Mini BM-201 specifications

Launched in 1990, the Konica Big Mini BM-201 is a a compact 35mm point and shoot film camera that originally sold for around $200 AUD / $130 USD. Here’s a run down of all the Big Mini specs:

  • Konica 35mm f3.5 lens, 4 elements in 4 groups, with a built-in skylight filter.
  • CDS centre weighted metering, exposure controlled automatically – no aperture or shutter controls.
  • Automatic DX code recognition: ISO25 to ISO3200. Non DX films rated at ISO25.
  • Auto film advance and rewind.
  • Nice, bright viewfinder.
  • LCD panel on the back showing the mode the camera is in, frame counter, and battery indicator.
  • Mode button cycles through flash modes (Auto flash, flash on, flash off) and exposure compensation (+1.5 aperture, -1.5 aperture)
  • Weighs just 200 grams with a CR123A battery.

Central Brisbane skyline from below. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Konica Big Mini manuals

You can find two Konica Big Mini manuals on the excellent camera manuals website from Mr Buktus. Make sure you throw him a few bucks if you find the manuals useful, which I’m sure you will.

Konica Big Mini BM-201 and BM-302 manuals

Using the Big Mini

I loved using the Big Mini. I only shot two rolls of film through it before I sadly had to send it back to the eBay seller I bought it off. They said it was in perfect working condition, but sadly the flash modes didn’t work, I suspect the exposure compensation also didn’t work, and the shutter was very hard to press.

The Big Mini has a reputation for having a hard to press shutter, but often I would have to press it four or five times quite firmly before it would take an image, marring an otherwise fun shooting experience.

Catching rays on Coochiemudlo Island. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Fujifilm C200 film. I like the way the Big Mini handled the exposure in this scene.

The camera makes a lovely sound as it turns on, the square / rectangular lens housing popping out of the sleek, stylish body, ready for action.

It has a nice bright viewfinder and I found it a pleasure to compose images with. When I was able to press the shutter, I really liked the noise it made. Some say it’s noisy, but I thought it was fine.

A mode button on the back cycles through flash and exposure compensation modes: Auto flash / Flash on / Flash off / Flash off +1.5 aperture / Flash off -1.5 aperture. The ability to alter exposure with these modes is a feature not usually seen on point and shoots other than high end models.

Also on the back is a frame counter and a battery level indicator. There’s also a self-timer button, a rewind film button, and on the base of the camera there’s a tripod socket.

It has a really stylish design for a mid-range compact camera – when it’s turned off, it’s a really nice light, compact size that easily fits in my pocket.

The film door of the Big Mini with its control / LCD panel.

I’m really happy with the images I took with the camera on Fujifilm C200 and Agfa Vista 400 film. The images look sharp, are well exposed, and have fantastic colour and contrast.

I really loved my two rolls with this much-admired point and shoot, and I’m on the look out for a replacement.

Big Mini Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Sleek, compact, light and stylish.
  • Great image quality thanks to that Konica 35mm f3.5 lens.
  • Exposure compensation – a feature not usually seen in mid-range point and shoots.
  • Super fun to use.

Cons

  • Reliability: the Big Mini is sadly a byword for unreliability. Even 10-15 years ago, many internet forums were awash with people talking about their cameras dying.
  • Price: with stocks dwindling and its reputation rising, you can no longer pick these up cheap, unless you’re very, very lucky.
  • Shutter button needs to be pressed quite firm on some models, marring what is otherwise a pleasant shooting experience.

Classic Jag. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Is the Big Mini a good buy in 2020?

It’s maybe not a good buy compared to so many other good mid-range point and shoots out there that can be picked up for $100USD or less (the Olympus MJU 1 and Olympus LT-1 spring to mind), but it’s a camera that has a certain “je ne sais quoi” about it. I will definitely try and pick another up, if I’m able to for a decent price.

Konica Big Mini sample images

Petrol station. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Naldham House, Brisbane. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

My favourite boat again! Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Trees at Capalaba. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Central Brisbane. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Agfa Vista 400 film.

Coochiemudlo Island sunset. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Fujifilm C200 film.

Victoria Point. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Fujifilm C200 film.

Yellow boat close up. Konica Big Mini BM-201 with Fujifilm C200 film.

In late August 2019, I met a giant of film photography podcasting. I say giant, because not only is he an integral part of one of the world’s favourite analogue photography podcasts, but also becuase he’s actually very tall. I am of course talking about when I drove down from Shropshire to meet Graeme from the Sunny 16 podcast in rural Oxfordshire.

Dumb and Dumber? / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

We raced around small villages, we shot expired film on plastic point and shoots, we recorded some audio, we talked about photography, and we were both very, very nervous about getting back to Graeme’s house late for dinner.

Some would call this rendezvous a meeting of two gentlemen, two intellectuals, two scholars. Others would describe it as rerun of Dumb and Dumber. Either way, check out the amazing photos below!

Images talked about in this episode

Selfie! That’s me with Graeme doing something in the background… I dread to think what he was up to… Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

Tractor / Matt / Panasonic C-525AFMatt / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

Hay bale / Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

The Giant / Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

Church doorway / Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

Sigh… I fell into the minimum focus distance trap. Here are some blackberries (or are they deadly nightshade?!) Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

English church / Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

RAF plane / Matt / Panasonic C-525AF / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2006

Hay bales / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Road sign / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Pandas / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Tombstone / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Village church / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

End of summer / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Check out that red! / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Moving selfie / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Ze plane, ze plane / Graeme / Olympus AF-10 XB / Expired Jessops Everyday Diamond film 2007

Me clearly not impressed by Graeme’s Jollubitel (spelling?)

 

Shropshire, how wonderful! This instalment of my travel with film podcast series details highlights from two weeks spent in the beautiful West Midlands of England. I acquired another 12 (yes 12!) cameras during this time. This episode also features call ins from Dustin Cogsdell of the Grainy Dayz podcast and our man in Thailand Matt Jones. Make sure you listen for details of how to win a bumper stash of film in time for the festive season!

Episode summary

  • Arrival from Switzerland
  • Staying in the barn
  • Just like Christmas! Five new cameras greeted me upon arrival
  • Shopping in Birmingham
  • The wedding
  • Staying at Aunty Shirley and Uncle Mark’s place
  • Bridgnorth and The Ashes
  • Norton car boot sale
  • Travel location and camera call ins from Dustin Cogsdell and Matt Jones
  • How you can win an amazing stash of 35mm film in early December!

Links discussed

Images discussed in this episode

My handsome rogue! England, Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400

Hydrangeas, Shropshire, England, Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400

Hydrangeas taken with the Disderi Robot, England, Kodak Gold 200

English country lane, Disderi Robot, England, Kodak Gold 200

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Gold 200

England, Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400

England, Kodak Gold 200, Olympus XA

Disderi Robot, Kodak Gold 200

Canon Prima AS-1, Kodak Gold 200

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Gold 200

England, Fujifilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400, wedding

England, Fujifilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400, wedding

Our family at the wedding! Fujifilm X-T2 with 18-55mm lens

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Portra 160

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Portra 160

England, Kodak Portra 400, Pentax PC35AF-M

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Portra 160

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Portra 160

 

Oops, forgot to describe this one in the podcast! Bridgnorth, England, Kodak Portra 400, Pentax PC35AF-M

England, Kodak Portra 400, Pentax PC35AF-M

Canon Prima AS-1, England, Kodak Portra 160

I forgot to mention this image! Selfie with the Disderi Robot, England, Kodak Gold 200

Mountains, lakes, cheese and chocolate. Fondue, trains, croissants and Swiss Army pocket knives. In August we spent an amazing five days and four nights in Switzerland. But what’s the link between Switzerland and cheap Instax Wide film?

Episode summary

  • Arrivng in Switzerland
  • My previous trips to Switerland in 1995 and 2007
  • Journey to Wengen in the Jungfrau region
  • Trip to see the snow at the Jungfraujoch
  • Day trip to Grindewald First to experience the First Glider, mountain karting, and trotti bikes!
  • Golden Pass line from Interlaken to Montreux
  • Beautiful Montreux on Lake Geneva
  • Chateau de Chillon
  • Day trip to Gruyeres
  • Shopping in Geneva

Images talked about in this episode

Wengen, Fujifilm X-T3. (Please forgive a rare digital image on Matt Loves Cameras!)

View from the gondola. Fujifilm Klasse S on Kodak Portra 400.

Grindewald First. Mint InstantKon RF70 on Instax Wide.

A promotional photo for the First Glider showing the activity in good weather!

Tissot Cliff Walk, Fujifilm X-T3

Kids on the cliff walk! Fujifilm X-T3

Alpine cows, Grindewald. Mint InstantKon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Mountain bike! Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200

Mountain chalet. Olympus LT-1 on Kodak Gold 200.

Flowers on Lake Geneva, Fujifilm Klasse S with Kodak Portra 400.

Flowers, Lake Geneva. Olympus XA on Kodak Gold 200.

Flowers on Lake Geneva, Olympus LT-1 on Kodak Gold 200.

Flowers, Lake Geneva. Mint InstantKon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Feeding the birds, Olympus LT-1 on Kodak Gold 200.

Swans, Lake Geneva, Olympus LT-1 on Kodak Gold 200.

Boarding the paddle steamer, Montreux. Olympus LT-1 with Kodak Gold 200.

Chateau de Chillon, Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200.

Chateau de Chillon, Olympus LT-1 on Kodak Gold 200.

On the Belle Epoque paddle boat, Lake Geneva. Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200.

Kids enjoying the boat ride! Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200.

Swan, Lake Geneva. Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200.

On Lake Geneva, Fujifilm Klasse S with Kodak Portra 400.

La Gruyere train, Disderi Robot with Kodak Gold 200.

View from the station, Montreux. Mint InstantKon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Four days, three nights in steamy Hong Kong with a Mint InstantKon RF70 and a fistful of point and shoots. Markets, tram rides, protests, and too many rollercoasters… but how many cameras did I take on my overseas holiday? That is the big question.

Episode summary

  • Our trip – one month overseas in Hong Kong, Switzerland and the UK
  • Cameras and film I took with me with – carry on
  • Cameras I took with me – checked baggage
  • Hong Kong arrival
  • Hong Kong
    • Markets
    • Star Ferry
    • Champagne Court camera stores
    • Mint Camera store
    • Hong Kong trams
  • Lots of drama the night we left Hong Kong
  • Holga Week – did you shoot your Holga?
  • Find out more about the 2019 Emulsive Secret Santa – if you sign up, put on the form that you found out about it from Matt Loves Cameras and maybe Em will *finally* add us to his list of film photography podcasts!
  • Episode 18 encouraged Sergio from Fresno, CA to buy a Mint InstantKon RF70!

Hong Kong markets

Bird Market, Hong Kong. Fujifilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Market Produce, Hong Kong. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400. The Klasse S and XA shots are almost identical!

Market produce, Hong Kong. Olympus XA on Kodak Gold 200.

Love the colours! Hong Kong. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Flower Market, Hong Kong. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Beautiful blooms at the Flower Market. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

 

Hong Kong street scene, Disderi Robot on Kodak Gold 200.

Protests

Terrible photo, but the only one I got of the protests. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Star Ferry

Bus station at Kowloon. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Star Ferry. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Hong Kong Harbour. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Lens fog on the Star Ferry. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Hong Kong Harbour. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Hong Kong Island. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Need a rickshaw? Call Mr Hung! Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

Dusk over the harbour. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Champagne Court

Olympus XA and Lomo LC-A

Leica lenses – as a rough guide, divide by 8 for USD, by 10 for GBP and 5 for AUD

Olympus Pen cameras

Nikon lenses at Champagne Court

Hong Kong trams

Taking a selfie on a Hong Kong tram. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Trams on Hong Kong island. Fujfilm Klasse S, Kodak Portra 400.

View from the back of a tram, Hong Kong. Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Hong Kong trams. Why were they all lined up at 4pm? Listen to the episode and find out! Mint Instantkon RF70 on Instax Wide.

Our departure

Holiday Inn had almost closed up by the time we wanted to leave for the airport.

My wife is a little alarmed by the crowds gathering

In this episode I review another pre-exposed film: Psychedelic Blues #2.  Check out the photos that I took with this fun, colourful film.

I also read some wonderful letters from listener Alan Daly – a former Polaroid sales rep from the UK! Make sure you check out Alan’s photos below, published with his kind permission.

Summary of episode 13 of Matt Loves Cameras

  • Psychedelic Blues film
  • Overview of pre-exposed films
    • Companies selling pre-exposed film
    • Typical costs
  • Why shoot with a pre-exposed film?
  • Differences between Yodica film that I shot and Psych Blues
  • Explanation of how Psych Blues is made
  • Description of Psych Blues #2
  • Lovely letters from listener Alan Daly in the UK. Alan is a former Polaroid sales rep! Check out the photos below!

Images I shot with Psych Blues film on an Olympus MJU II / Stylus Epic

My daughter at the shops – next time I will shoot a whole lot more portraits with this film!

William Jolly Bridge in Brisbane

Cinemas in Elizabeth Street, Brisbane

Vespa!

Pretty flowers outside the Treasury Hotel, Brisbane

More pretty flowers outside the Treasury Hotel, Brisbane

Ford Mustang for sale!

Rear section of the Ford Mustang

Check out these amazing Polaroid images courtesy of Alan Daly

Thanks so much to listener Alan Daly for getting in touch and giving me permission to share these amazing photos he took!

Wakka wakka! It’s Fozzie Bear! Check out the transparent 660 camera in the bottom right of this image.

UK Polaroid sales conference in Malta, August 1981

Alan’s self portrait!

 

Alan took this photo of Formula One champ James Hunt!

Join the dark slide… I mean dark side!

Episode 11 summary

  • Shooting photos on Campuhan Ridge, Ubud, Bali
  • Shooting film photos at Borobudur Temple and Market
  • What I would do differently on the next trip
  • Random travel related shoutouts!

Shoutouts

Images discussed in Episode 11 of Matt Loves Cameras

Ubud, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Cinestill 800T film.

Ubud, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Cinestill 800T film.

Early morning at Campuhan Ridge, Ubud, Bali. Olympus LT-1 with Kodak Gold 200.

Titra Empul temple, Bali. Olympus LT-1 with Kodak Gold 200.

Java, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Cinestill 800T film.

Borobudur, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Cinestill 800T film.

Borobudur Temple, Indonesia. Olympus LT-1 with Kodak Gold 200.

Borobudur Temple, Indonesia. Olympus LT-1 with Kodak Gold 200.

Borobudur Market, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Cinestill 800T film.

Flowers at Borobudur Market, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

Eggs in Borobudur Market, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

More eggs in Borobudur Market. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

Some friendly people in the market. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

Love the colours of the chillies! Borobudur, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Fujifilm Klasse S with Fujifilm Superia 1600 film.

 

In episode 10 of Matt Loves Cameras I review one of the SMALLEST 35mm cameras ever made! It’s not the Rollei 35, it’s not the Olympus XA or the Olympus MJU II / Stylus Epic, it’s not even a Minox, though it’s very closely related to a Minox! Enter the Voigtlander Vito C!

I love the images I’ve captured with this camera and will continue to use this lovely little camera. Marshall Dalmatian makes a most unwelcome podcast debut halfway through this episode.

Episode 10 summary

  • Similar cameras made by Balda: Minox 35, Balda C35, Voigtlander Vito C
  • Brief history of Balda – folding cameras, making cameras for other companies, World War 2, move to West Germany
  • Differences between the compact Balda made cameras: aperture priority, exposure compensation, batteries
  • Voigtlander Vito C specifications and description
  • Is this the best pocket camera? maybe…
  • How I got this camera
  • Images taken with the Balda-made Voigtlander Vito C
  • Curious light leak
  • Ratings

Shout outs

Images taken with the Voigtlander Vito C

Sydney Harbour, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed

Sydney Opera House, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed

Sydney Opera House, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed

Sydney, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed.

Sydney, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed

Frame burn! Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film, cross processed

 

Frame burn! Espresso Engine, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Superia 400

Outside John Mills Himself, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Superia 400

Cleveland Lighthouse, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Superia 400. Check out the light leak!

Swim time! Voigtlander Vito C with expired Superia 400

Sarah in a field, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Superia 400

Park Road station. Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film rated at 160, developed in E6.

My faithful companion, Marshall Dalmatian. Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film rated at 160 developed in E6.

Brisbane City. Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film rated at 160 developed in E6.

Letterboxes, Voigtlander Vito C with expired Lomography Color 200 slide film rated at 160 developed in E6.

Circular Quay, Voigtlander Vito C with Ilford FP4.

Sydney Opera House, Voigtlander Vito C with Ilford FP4.

Sydney Opera House, Voigtlander Vito C with Ilford FP4.

Sydney, Voigtlander Vito C with Ilford FP4.

Episode 8 summary

  • Expired Film Day 2019
  • Shooting expired colour print film
  • Shooting expired colour transparency film
  • Shooting 2003 Kodak Ektachrome 64T colour transparency film in my Fujifilm Klasse S
  • Shooting 2011 Lomography Colour 200 Slide film in a Voigtlander Vito C (Minox looking plastic camera)
  • Description of the images (see them below)
  • I won the Sunny 16 Cheap Shots Challenge! Check out the images I shot in the Episode 4 show notes
  • Selling expired vintage 16mm Kodak film to Mike Raso from the Film Photography Project
  • My order from the Film Photography Project store – including FPP Retrochrome film
  • New film photography podcasts: Uncle Jonesy’s Cameras, Grainy Dayz and Embrace the Grain

Shoutouts

Images taken with expired slide film

Details for each image in the caption.

Aparments in South Brisbane shot on 2003 Kodak Ektachrome 64T transparency film on my Fujifilm Klasse S (rated at ISO 50).

Leading lines, South Brisbane. Building in South Brisbane shot on 2003 Kodak Ektachrome 64T transparency film on my Fujifilm Klasse S (rated at ISO 50).

Albert Street, Brisbane. Leading lines, South Brisbane. Shot on 2003 Kodak Ektachrome 64T transparency film on my Fujifilm Klasse S (rated at ISO 50).

My faithful companion, Marshall Dalmatian. 2011 Lomography Colour 200 Slide film (rated at ISO 160) in a Voigtlander Vito C plastic camera.

Brisbane Botanic Gardens. 2011 Lomography Colour 200 Slide film (rated at ISO 160) in a Voigtlander Vito C plastic camera.

South Bank, Brisbane (image inverted). 2011 Lomography Colour 200 Slide film (rated at ISO 160) in a Voigtlander Vito C plastic camera.

 

Have you ever used a pre-exposed film? Did you love it? Hate it? Or would you never even consider it?

I’ve bought three rolls of pre-exposed film from three different brands. Here is the review of the Yodica Antares film, shot on an Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity). Because if you’re going to shoot a film that many photographers hate, why not shoot it on a camera many photographers hate?

Also a reminder about Expired Film Day coming up on 15-16-17 March 2019!

Summary of episode 7 of Matt Loves Cameras

  • Introduction
  • Different pre-exposed films on the market
  • Why shoot with a pre-exposed film?
  • About Yodica Films
  • Images shot with Yodica Antares

Shoutouts

Images taken on Yodica Antares film

Stop the press! I have just updated this episode with some very important information thanks to Jennyfer in the comments below. Yodica films have no DX code. I shot this roll in an Olympus MJU II which defaults to ISO100 when there is no DX code. These images were shot at two stops overexposed, which is why the pre-exposed colours are either not at strong as they should be, or non-existent in some frames! Remember this if you shoot a Yodica film – either shoot in a camera where you can set the ISO or carefully remove the label to expose the DX code.

My daughter in a field. I love this shot! Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

Road trip sunflowers! Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

Murray’s Bridge Hall, Queensland. Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

Railway tracks. Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

My faithful companion! Marshall Dalmatian. Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

Blurry handheld shot of Brisbane at dusk. Next time I will take the tripod! Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

This is what happens when you leave the flash on at night! Look at those pre-exposed colours! Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic Infinity)

More sunflowers! Yodica Antares film shot on Olympus MJU II (Stylus Epic)

Old country hotel

Wide open roads of country Queensland

No noticeable effect on this frame due to me shooting the film at 2 stops over

Livestock crossing

Get in touch

If you have any feedback I’d love to hear from you! [email protected]

An epic battle between two premium and compact all stars: the Fujifilm Klasse and the Fujifilm Klasse S!

How much would you pay for a premium compact camera? $200? $500? $1000? Last year I bought not one, but two premium compact cameras, both made by the same manufacturer in the 21st century.

I am of course talking about the Fujifilm Klasse and the Fujifilm Klasse S. I shot two rolls of film side by side with these cameras to see if there was any difference in image quality. The biggest differences between the two cameras is actually the feature set. Which one is right for you?

I also talk about the rising prices of premium compact cameras and the BEST reason to choose a cheap point and shoot camera – expectations! Also listen to why it’s always best to thoroughly research which camera you’re buying.

Episode 6 summary

  • Introduction
  • History of the development of the Klasse camera in 2001
  • The Rollei AFM 35 is the same camera
  • Fujifilm colour reversal films (slide films)
  • 2001: the peak of colour film sales
  • Fujifilm Klasse S and Fujifilm Klasse W released in 2007
  • Specfications for Fujifilm Klasse and Fujifilm Klasse S
  • Similarities and differences
  • What they’re like to shoot
  • Discussion of the images taken with both cameras (see images below)
  • Expectations: the one big reason why a cheap point and shoot is your best friend!
  • Weekly roundup

Shoutouts

Images taken with the Klasse and Klasse S

Check the captions for which camera was used.

 

Fujifilm Klasse S / C200

Fujifilm Klasse / Kodak Gold 200

Fujifilm Klasse / C200

Fujifilm Klasse S / Kodak Gold 200

Fujifilm Klasse / C200

Fujifilm Klasse / C200

Klasse (original) photographed by the Klasse S / Kodak Gold 200

Klasse S photographed by the Klasse (original) / Kodak Gold 200

Get in touch

If you have any feedback I’d love to hear from you! [email protected]